Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa
Conseil pour le développement de la recherche en sciences sociales en Afrique
Conselho para o Desenvolvimento da Pesquisa em Ciências Sociais em África
مجلس تنمية البحوث الإجتماعية في أفريقيا


The Popular Arts and Culture in the Texture of the Public Sphere in Africa

Tsitsi Dangarembga. The Popular Arts and Culture
in the Texture of the Public Sphere in Africa. Dakar, CODESRIA, Lectures Series n°4, 2010, 11 p. ISBN: 978-2-86978-312-6

Number of visits: 1954

This lecture plots the African experience in a projectory that rejects binarism and seeks to construct a unitary socio-psychological map of that experience, thereby positing what has been seen to be fragmented in past theorising as a functional whole. It refers to liberal theories of the public space and posits these with emerging continental thought to construct the notion of the ‘African not I’ as a psychological entity that functions in the mainstream to discount African experience. The lecture concludes by suggesting ways in which popular culture may be used in residual public spheres to bolster positive subjective consciousness.

Tsitsi Dangarembga is an accomplished writer, dramatist, theatre and film
producer. A graduate of the University of Zimbabwe and the Deutsche Filmund
Fernsehakademie Berlin, her short story The Letter won the SIDA Award in
1985 and her first novel Nervous Condition won the Commonwealth Writer’s
Prize in 1989. Among the plays she has written and directed are She No Longer
Weeps, The Lost of the Soil, and The Third One. She has also produced fourteen
films, most notable among which is Everyone’s Child, shown worldwide at
various festivals, including the Dublin Film Festival. She has also won
professional merit awards in Zimbabwe, South Africa and the United States of
America. Since 1989, she has been engaged in delivering lectures, addresses
and readings at various literary gatherings, academic conferences and film
festivals.

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