Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa
Conseil pour le développement de la recherche en sciences sociales en Afrique
Conselho para o Desenvolvimento da Pesquisa em Ciências Sociais em África
مجلس تنمية البحوث الإجتماعية في أفريقيا


The Crises of Postcoloniality in Africa

The Crises of Postcoloniality in Africa. Edited by Kenneth Omeje. Dakar, CODESRIA, 2015, 248p:, ISBN: 978-2-86978-602-8

Number of visits: 1787

The Crises of Postcoloniality in Africa is an assemblage of transdisciplinary essays
that offer a spirited reflection on the debate and phenomenon of postcoloniality in
Africa, including the changing patterns and ramifications of problems, challenges and
opportunities associated with it. A key conceptual rhythm that runs through the various chapters of the book is that, far from being demised, postcoloniality is still firmly embedded in Africa, manifesting itself in both blatant and insidious forms. Among the important themes covered in the book include the concepts of postcolonialism, postcoloniality, and neocolonialism; Africa’s precolonial formations and the impact of colonialism; the enduring patterns of colonial legacies in Africa; the persistent contradictions between African indigenous institutions and western versions of modernity; the unravelling of the postcolonial state and issues of armed conflict, conflict intervention and peacebuilding; postcolonial imperialism in Africa and the US-led global war on terror, the historical and postcolonial contexts of gender relations in Africa, as well as pan-Africanism and regionalist approaches to redressing the crises of postcoloniality.

‘In this book, the colonial trope of Africa is subjected to critical analyses from the points of view of postcoloniality. The result is a varied, complex, and interesting exposition of the contemporary challenges and dilemmas of Africa from the many standpoints of postcolonial theory. It makes a useful contribution to our understanding of modern African politics.’

Abdul Raufu Mustapha,
Department of International Development,
University of Oxford

Kenneth Omeje is Senior Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Bradford’s John & Elnora Ferguson Centre for African Studies and Professor of International Relations at the United States International University in Nairobi, Kenya.




Comments