Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa
Conseil pour le développement de la recherche en sciences sociales en Afrique
Conselho para o Desenvolvimento da Pesquisa em Ciências Sociais em África
مجلس تنمية البحوث الإجتماعية في أفريقيا


Diaspora Research Partnerships Networks’ Launching Workshop

Number of visits: 1442

14 -16 October, Nairobi, Kenya -
With Financial support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York (CCNY), CODESRIA is implementing an intervention to revamp research and teaching of the Social Sciences and Humanities in Africa universities. This project seeks to mobilize African academics in the diaspora to help address some of the problems that African universities are faced with. The overriding objective of this initiative is to contribute to the strengthening of African universities, the nurturing of new generations of scholars in Africa in a culture of excellence, and the revitalization of the social sciences and humanities (SSH). The specific objectives include the strengthening of PhD programs, and the curricula in the social sciences and humanities, contribute to the filling of gaps and dealing with shortages in teaching, PhD supervision and mentoring of young social science scholars in Africa, more generally, as well as in strengthening the relationships and linkages between African academics in the diaspora and the institutions where they are based with African universities.

The initiative is being implemented through a series of activities that involve a partnership between African academics in the Diaspora and their counter-parts based in African Universities. The initiative is borne out of the recognition that the African higher education sector has, in the last two decades, expanded tremendously, but still faces myriad challenges to thrive. The number of public and private universities has increased, thanks to the wide recognition of the centrality of higher education to knowledge economies and societies, and to development. However, the rapid expansion of the sector has not been followed by a proportional increase in staffing and academic supervision capacity.




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